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The Best Video Cameras in 2023

In this article, I will be helping you find the perfect video-centric camera for your budget.

With so many great camera releases in 2022, it’s a great time to be in the market for a new camera. I’ll be covering four budget categories: low budget (below $1000), mid-range ($1000-$2000), semi-professional ($2000-$3000), and professional (above $3000). Please note that prices may vary depending on your location and taxes.

I’ll be focusing on hybrid cameras that are more geared toward video rather than cinema cameras and camcorders because I think that’s what most content creators prefer working with.

Low-Budget (below $1000)

If you’re in the market for a new camera and you’re working with a budget of less than $1000, you have a few options to consider.

Sony ZV-E10 *

The Sony ZV-E10 is a good choice with a price of $798 with the kit lens or $698 without it. This camera has 4K resolution, FHD 120P, good autofocus, and a new Sony color profile. It also has digital IS, a mic input, and allows you to invest in full-frame lenses.

However, it does have a bad rolling shutter, no IBIS (in-body image stabilization), and is heavy with a significant crop when using the kit lens without OIS. It also lacks 4K 60P and is only 8-bit.

ZV-E10 in short

  • Positive
    • 4K30P
    • 120P slow motion in 1080P
    • good autofocus
    • new Sony colors
    • price
    • digital stabilization
    • mic-input
    • you can use Sony full-frame lenses with it
    • live streaming
  • Negatives
    • very bad rolling shutter
    • no sensor stabilization
    • heavy dis crop (too close for vlogging)
    • no 4K60P
    • only 8-bit

Nikon Z30 *

The Nikon Z30 is another option with a body-only price of $657 and kit options ranging from $797 to $1047. It has 4K resolution, good (but not great) autofocus, FHD 120P, a digital IS, a mic-input, and allows for investment in Z full-frame lenses. The good thing compared to the ZVE10 is that it doesn’t add a crop when using DIS. However, it does not have 4K 60P and is only 8-bit with a flat profile.

Z30 overview

  • Positives
    • 4K
    • good autofocus but not Sony good
    • 120P slow motion in 1080P
    • price
    • digital is without a crop!
    • mic-input
    • you can use Nikon full-frame lenses with it
    • live streaming
  • Negatives
    • no 4k 60P
    • no sensor stabilization
    • only 8-bit but with a flat color-profile

Canon R10 *

The Canon R10 is priced at $879 for the body only, $999 with the 18-45mm lens, or $1279 with both the 18-45mm and 50-250mm lenses. It has 4K30P oversampled from 6K, 4K60P with a 1.64x crop, FHD 120P, good (but not great) autofocus, a mic input, and the ability for live streaming.

However, it has limited lens options (though it can use EF lenses), no IBIS and the 4K60 crop is pretty bad but still better than not having 4K60.

R10 overview

  • Positives
    • 4K30P oversampled from 6K
    • 4K60P but cropped at 1.64x
    • 10bit in HDR PQ mode – good for color grading
    • 120P slow motion in 1080P
    • good autofocus but not Sony good
    • mic-input
    • live streaming
  • Negatives
    • limited lens options – you can use Canon ef-s lenses tough
    • no ibis
    • rolling shutter

Fujifilm X-S10 *

The Fujifilm X-S10 is priced at $999 without a lens. It has IBIS, 4K resolution, FHD 240P, sensor IS and DIS, Fuji colors, and mic input (though no audio for live streaming). The IBIS is definitely the standout feature of this camera, which helps a lot with vlogging. If available, get it with the 15-45mm kit lens as it’s quite wide.

The major downside is the autofocus, which is useable in single-point and slow settings but not good at tracking subjects. It also lacks 4K60P and is only 8-bit.

X-S10 overview

  • Positives
    • sensor stabilization (IBIS)
    • 4K30P
    • 240P super slow motion in 1080P
    • IBIS can be combined with DIS and OIS lenses
    • Fujifilm Film Simulations (really nice colors straight out of camera)
    • mic-input
  • Negatives
    • no 4K60P
    • only 8-bit
    • okayish autofocus

Other Cameras

If autofocus is not a major concern, the Panasonic G85 *, G95 *, and G9 * are also good options in this budget range. They all have excellent IBIS and 4K resolution, with the G9 even offering 4K60P and 10-bit.

Mid-Range ($1000 – $2000)

When it comes to choosing a mid-range camera, there are a lot of great options on the market. In this article, I’ll be comparing the Canon R7, Sony FX30, Panasonic S5, Panasonic S5 Mark II, and Fujifilm X-H2 to help you decide which one is the best fit for you.

Canon R7 *

The Canon R7 is priced at $1499 body only and offers some impressive video capabilities. It can shoot 4K 60P without any crop, as well as FHD 120P. It also has 10BIT 4:2:2, CLOG3, and autofocus. The sensor has image stabilization (IS) and there’s a mic input for better audio.

On the negative side, there is a crop in 4K60P to consider. The lens options are also very limited unless you use an EF-RF adapter. The R7 also only uses a micro HDMI port.

R7 overview

  • Positives
    • 4K60P – no crop but pixel binned (less sharp)
    • 120P slow motion in 1080P
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • CLOG3 (good for color grading)
    • good autofocus
    • sensor stabilization
    • mic input
  • Negatives
    • limited lens options – you can use Canon ef-s lenses tough
    • micro HDMI

Sony FX30 *

Next up is the Sony FX30, which is priced at $1798 body only. It can shoot 4K 60P without any crop, as well as 4K 120P with a 1.6x crop. It also has 10BIT 4:2:2 and SLOG3, making it a good choice for professionals. It has timecode, 16-bit raw output, autofocus, sensor IS, and a mic input. It also has LUT support and breathing compensation.

The only negative to consider is the crop in 4K120. It’s also an APS’C camera, but I don’t consider that a downside as it comes with advantages and disadvantages.

FX30 overview

  • Positives
    • 4K60P without a crop
    • 4K120P with 1.6x crop
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • SLOG3 (good for color grading)
    • timecode for professionals
    • 16bit raw video output
    • good autofocus
    • sensor stabilization
    • mic input
    • LUT support
    • breathing compensation
    • great body to rig it up
  • Negatives
    • crop in 4K120

Panasonic S5 *

The Panasonic S5 is priced at $1497 body only and has some impressive video capabilities as well. It can shoot 4K30 with oversampling, 4K 60P, and FHD 180P. It also has 10BIT 4:2:2 and V-LOG and can output 5.9K raw via HDMI. It has great in-body image stabilization (IBIS) and a mic input.

However, the autofocus isn’t reliable, but if that’s not an issue for you, the S5 is a great budget full-frame option. There is also a crop in 4K60P.

S5 overview

  • Positives
    • 4K30P oversampled
    • 4K60P with crop
    • 180P slow motion in 1080P
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • V-LOG
    • 5.9K RAW via HDMI
    • great IBIS
    • mic input
    • good dynamic range
  • Negatives
    • bad autofocus
    • crop in 4K60P
    • limited lens options

Panasonic S5 ii *

The Panasonic S5 Mark II is a bit more expensive at $1999 body only and has many of the same features as the original S5. It can shoot 4K30 with oversampling, 4K 60P, and FHD 180P, and has 10BIT 4:2:2 and V-LOG. It can also output 5.9K raw via HDMI and has great IBIS. In addition, it has a waveform monitor, shutter angle, and a reliable autofocus system. It also has a mic input and good dynamic range. However, there is still a crop in 4K60P.

A concern with Panasonic in the past has always been autofocus. Luckily, they added phase detect autofocus to the S5 ii, which makes the autofocus finally reliable. According to reviews, it’s still not on the level of Sony and Canon, but very usable.

S5 ii overview

  • Positives
    • 6K30P
    • 4K30P oversampled
    • 4K60P with crop
    • 180P slow motion in 1080P
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • V-LOG
    • 5.9K RAW via HDMI
    • best IBIS of all
    • mic input
    • good dynamic range
    • finally good autofocus but not Sony good
  • Negatives
    • crop in 4K60P
    • limited lens options

Fujifilm X-H2 *

Finally, the Fujifilm X-H2 is priced at $1999 body only and has some impressive video capabilities. It can shoot 8K 30P, 4K 60P without any crop, and FHD 240P. It also has 10BIT 4:2:2 and can output a full HDMI for 12-bit raw. It has ProRes and film simulations, as well as sensor IS and a mic input. However, the autofocus system isn’t the best and many of the lenses are not optimized for video. It also has an APSC sensor, which is a bit weaker in low light but still good overall.

In conclusion, all of these mid-range cameras have their own unique features and capabilities. The Panasonic S5 ii and Sony FX30 both have the most impressive video capabilities and can therefore even mess with cameras between $2000 and $3000. They might actually question why you should pay more as both cameras give you everything that you really need.

X-H2 overview

  • Positives
    • 8K30P
    • 4K60P no crop
    • FHD 240P
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • Full HDMI for 12bit Raw
    • internal ProRes recording
    • CFast Express Type B card support
    • Film Simulations
    • IBIS
    • mic input
  • Negatives
    • autofocus (good but not great)
    • many lenses are not video optimized
    • APS-C sensor size, a bit weaker in low light but still good

Semi-Professional ($2000-$3000)

When it comes to semi-professional cameras, there are a few key players in the market that offer a solid balance between price and performance. In this section, we’ll be taking a look at three options that fall within the $2000-$3000 range: the Canon R6 mark ii, the Sony a7iv, and the Fujifilm X-H2S.

Canon R6 mark ii *

First up is the Canon R6 mark ii. This camera is priced at $2499 for the body only and offers a number of impressive features for videographers. One of its standout features is the ability to shoot in 4K at 60 frames per second with no crop and oversampled from 6K, as well as Full HD at 180 frames per second. It also boasts 10-bit 4:2:2 color depth and includes in-body image stabilization (IS). Other notable features include a mic input, false color display, and breathing compensation to remove focus breathing on certain lenses. It also has a quite good rolling shutter performance.

On the downside, it can be expensive to purchase additional lenses for this camera and it only has a micro HDMI port. Additionally, some users have noted that it doesn’t have quite as wide a dynamic range as some other cameras in this price range.

R6 mark ii overview

  • Pros
    • full frame 4K60P without a crop
    • FHD 180P
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • autofocus + subject only
    • IBIS
    • mic input
    • false color
    • breathing compensation
  • Negatives
    • expensive Lenses
    • micro HDMI
    • a bit lower dynamic range than other cameras in that price range

Sony a7iv *

Next up is the Sony a7iv. This camera is also priced at $2499 for the body only and offers similar features to the Canon R6 mark ii. It can shoot in 4K at 60 frames per second, as well as Full HD at 120 frames per second. It also has 10-bit 4:2:2 color depth and autofocus, as well as a mic input and a full-size HDMI port. One of the major advantages of this camera is the wide range of lens options available. However, it does have a crop when shooting in 4K at 60 frames per second and is known for not having the best rolling shutter.

a7iv overview

  • Positives
    • 4K60P
    • FHD 120P
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • very good autofocus
    • IBIS
    • mic input
    • many lens options in all price classes
    • full-size HDMI
    • breathing compensation
  • Negatives
    • crop in 4K 60P
    • rolling shutter

Fujifilm X-H2S *

Finally, there’s the Fujifilm X-H2S. This camera is also priced at $2499 for the body only and offers a number of impressive video features. It can shoot in 4K at 60 frames per second with no crop, as well as 4K at 120 frames per second with a slight 1.29x crop and 6.2K in 3×2 Open Gate mode. It also has a fast Full HD frame rate of 180 frames per second and 10-bit 4:2:2 color depth. Additionally, it offers internal ProRes recording and Fujifilm’s famous Film Simulations.

On the downside, the autofocus, while performing very well in most situations, is slightly behind Sony and Canon and many of its lenses are not optimized for video. It also has a smaller APS-C sensor which can be a bit weaker in low light, though it is still considered to be a solid performer in this regard.

X-H2S overview

  • Positives
    • 4K60P no crop
    • 4K120P slight crop 1.29x
    • 6.2K30P Open Gate
    • FHD 180P
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • internal ProRes recording
    • CFast Express Type B card support
    • excellent rolling shutter performance
    • Fujifilm film simulations
    • IBIS
    • mic input
  • Negatives
    • AUTOFOCUS
    • many lenses are not video optimized
    • APS-C sensor size, a bit weaker in low light but still good

Overall, all three of these cameras offer a solid balance of price and performance for semi-professional videographers. Which one is right for you will depend on your specific needs and preferences. The Canon R6 mark ii offers impressive high frame rate options and in-body image stabilization, while the Sony a7iv has a wide range of lens options and a full-size HDMI port. The Fujifilm X-H2S stands out with its high frame rate options, excellent rolling shutter performance, and film simulations, but may not be the best choice for those who need the best autofocus and video-oriented lens options.

Professional ($3000+)

In the professional camera market, there are several high-end options to choose from. Each camera has its own set of positives and negatives, and it ultimately comes down to the user’s specific needs and preferences.

Sony A7Siii & FX3 *

The Sony a7Siii and FX3 are both excellent choices for professionals. The a7Siii has a price tag of $3498, while the FX3 costs $3898. Both cameras have 4K120P and 10BIT 4:2:2 capabilities, as well as autofocus and sensor IS and DIS. They are also known for their low light capabilities and excellent rolling shutter. In addition, they have mic input and a variety of lens options, as well as fullsize HDMI. The only negative of these cameras is their relatively low megapixel count of 12MP, which may be an issue for photographers.

a7Siii / FX3 overview

  • Positives
    • 4K120P
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • great autofocus
    • IBIS
    • very good in low light
    • excellent rolling shutter performance
    • mic input
    • lots of lens options in all price classes
    • full-size HDMI
  • Negatives
    • only 12MP (only an issue for photos – good enough for social media)

Canon R5 *

Another option in the professional market is the Canon R5, which has a body-only price of $3699. The R5 boasts 8K 30P RAW video, 4K oversampled video at 30P, and the ability to record 4K at up to 120P (not oversampled). It also has DCI capabilities in 8K and 4K, as well as 10BIT 4:2:2 and autofocus. It has a mic input and a high megapixel count of 45MP for photographs. Additionally, it has a timelapse feature in 8K and decent low-light performance thanks to oversampling from 8K.

One of the negatives of this camera is the expense of its lenses, as well as its micro HDMI port. The Canon R5C is a similar camera with improved overheating protection, 8K60P and other professional features.

R5 overview

  • Positives
    • 8K30P RAW
    • 4K30P oversampled
    • 4K up to 120P, not oversampled
    • DCI in 8K & 4K
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • good autofocus
    • IBIS
    • mic input
    • 45MP for photos
    • 8K time-lapse feature
    • decent low light thanks to oversampling from 8K
    • overheating is solved
  • Negatives
    • expensive lenses
    • micro HDMI
    • a bit lower dynamic range than other cameras in that price range

Canon R3 *

The Canon R3 is another professional camera option, with a body-only price of $5999. It has 6K 60P RAW video, 4K 120P video, and DCI 4K capabilities. It also has 10BIT 4:2:2 and a great autofocus system, as well as a mic input. One of the standout features of the R3 is its great rolling shutter, thanks to its stacked sensor.

However, it does have expensive lenses and only a micro HDMI port.

R3 overview

  • Positives
    • 6K60P RAW
    • 4K120P
    • DCI 4K
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • good autofocus
    • IBIS
    • mic input
    • great rolling shutter performance thanks to the stacked sensor
  • Negatives
    • expensive lenses
    • micro HDMI
    • a bit lower dynamic range than other cameras in that price range

Nikon Z9 *

Lastly, the Nikon Z9 is a professional camera with a body-only price of $5497. It has 8.3K 60P RAW video capabilities, as well as 4K 120P video and DCI 4K. It also has 10BIT 4:2:2 and sensor IS, as well as a mic input and a 45MP sensor. It has a full-size HDMI port, but its rolling shutter is not as good as some of the other cameras in its price range (except if recording in 4K60 or 120P). It also has a lower dynamic range compared to some of the other cameras in this category.

Z9 overview

  • Positives
    • 8.3K 30P RAW
    • 4.1K 60P RAW
    • 4K 120P
    • DCI 4K
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • IBIS
    • mic input
    • good rolling shutter but better on R3, X-H2S & a7Siii, except if you record in 4K60 or 120P
    • 45MP sensor
    • full-size HDMI
  • Negatives
    • fewer lens options
    • a bit lower dynamic range than other cameras

Sony A1 *

In addition to the cameras previously mentioned, the Sony A1 is another professional option worth considering. It has a body-only price of $6498.

The Sony A1 has a number of impressive features, including 8K 30P video, 4K 120P video, and DCI 8K and 4K capabilities. It has a 50.1 megapixel sensor and can capture stills at up to 30 frames per second. It also has 10BIT 4:2:2 video and autofocus, as well as sensor IS and a mic input. It has a full-size HDMI port and a variety of lens options.

One of the standout features of the Sony A1 is its low light performance, thanks to its over-sampling from the high megapixel count and advanced image processing capabilities. It also has an excellent rolling shutter and a fast electronic shutter.

Overall, the Sony A1 is a top-of-the-line professional camera with a variety of impressive features. It is a bit more expensive than some of the other options on the market, but for those who need the highest performance and quality, it may be worth the investment.

A1 overview

  • Positives
    • 8K30P
    • 4K120P
    • 10BIT 4:2:2
    • good autofocus
    • IBIS
    • lots of lens options in all price classes
    • full-size HDMI
    • 50MP photos
    • good rolling shutter performance for 8K
  • Negatives
    • no flip screen

Conclusion

In conclusion, there are a wide variety of camera options available depending on your level of experience and specific needs.

For those just starting out shooting videos, the Fuji X-S10 * is a great entry-level option. However, if you need better autofocus, go for the Nikon Z30 * or Canon R10 * with an EF to RF adapter * (including a VND filter) and EF-S lenses *.

Mid-range shooters may want to consider the Sony FX30 * or Panasonic S5 ii. Videographers in the semi-professional category only have great options. It’s mostly a matter of needs and taste between the Sony a7iv *, Canon R6 ii *, and Fujifilm X-H2S *. However, you can save a few bucks here by going for a Panasonic S5 ii * or Sony FX30 * as these cameras can compete with semi-professional cameras but are cheaper.

For professional videographers, the Sony a7Siii * / FX3 * are excellent choices for a good price. The pricier options all have more megapixels and stacked sensors, which makes them excellent for both photo and video without compromises.

No matter what your needs are, there is a camera out there that is perfect for you.

* = Affiliate Link – I get a small commission if you buy through this link but you don’t pay anything extra.

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Pascal Basel
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